David Morin

8 years ago, I committed to build my social confidence and become great at connecting with people.

Hundreds of books and thousands of interactions later, I'm ready to share with the world what I’ve learned.

The interest in my findings has been beyond my dreams. We now have 30 000 members taking our courses. Perhaps you’ve seen my writing in magazines like Business Insider and Lifehacker.

Follow me on Twitter or Read more.

8 years ago, I committed to build my social confidence and become great at connecting with people.

Hundreds of books and thousands of interactions later, I'm ready to share with the world what I’ve learned.

The interest in my findings has been beyond my dreams. We now have 30 000 members taking our courses. Perhaps you’ve seen my writing in magazines like Business Insider and Lifehacker.

Follow me on Twitter or Read more.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Comments (3)

  1. Anonymous

    I myself brought out my fake self at times and compromised my values to be accepted by groups. This incited a conflict within me and I felt like a dual personality. It also cost me a few of the authentic friends I made and bonded with since they eventually came to see my doublefacedness. Never again, I swear, will i change my values and opinions just to be accepted by people and get their approval. It’s better to lose people who cannot be comfortable with your different opinion rather than loosing urself by loosing ur values.

  2. I think I understand clearly what you mean.

    That’s why it’s called social SKILLS. Part of social skills is adjusting to different situations and people, yet still being oneself. Just like if you were to make a speech to children, it were have a different ring to it than if you spoke to grownups.

    However, it’s important not to make assumptions about other people based on superficial appearances and start acting similarly to what one might assume they’re like based on, say, their ethnicity. Also, even when talking to children, it’s important to speak their “language” but not talk down to them.

    • David Morin

      That’s great input Jean. You want to build rapport with the individual and not base it on prejudice.