Amanda Haworth

The 5 Best Books for Introverts 2019

These are the best books for introverts, carefully reviewed and ranked.

We have separate book guides on social skills, conversation skills, social anxiety, confidence, self-esteemmaking friends, and body language.

Introvert (n) A shy, reticent person

If you were to google the definition of the word “introvert,” the above is the first thing you will find. (Really. Go do it.)

As a real live introvert, I object to this definition—not only because it is placing all introverts in the same stereotypical category, but also because it is ignoring the many different personality traits we possess (plot twist: we aren’t all shy).

Additionally, the above definition is scientifically incorrect, based on the abundance of research that has up ’til 2019 on this “mysterious” group of people known as introverts.

To be fair, I can’t blame the world for not understanding us since I don’t always understand us myself. But I’m amazed by how accepted and understood I feel when I read books and articles written by psychologists, researchers, and other introverts who can explain to me why I do what I do and feel what I feel.

The following five books for introverts have received considerable praise and have made their way onto my own personal “To Do Read” list (because, as an introvert, I’d rather stay home and read than go anywhere that I have to do anything).

I hope you’ll join me in reading these best-selling, research-based books for introverts so that you too can recognize the many benefits that come from being “one of us.”

1. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

This book by Susan Cain is undoubtedly the most popular book on the market at the moment on the topic of introversion, and it is number one on my list of things to read. In her book, Cain points out that some of the worlds best-known names have been introverts (think Mark Twain, Dr. Seuss, Rosa Parks, etc.). As she dives into the many accomplishments of introverts throughout history, Cain emphasizes the point that to underestimate introverts would be a huge detriment to our society. Along with this truth, the author provides some strategies for using the power of your introversion to be successful both personally and professionally.

Find Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking here.

2. Hiding in the Bathroom: An Introvert’s Roadmap to Getting Out There (When You’d Rather Stay Home)

Written by Morra Aarons-Mele, this book made my number two spot because I have quite literally hidden in the bathroom at times in an effort to avoid uncomfortable social situations (which, in my case, is almost all social situations). As she addresses the myth that most successful people are of the out-going, extroverted personality type, Aarons-Mele explains how introverts can be successful not in spite of their introversion, but because of it.

Find Hiding in the Bathroom: An Introvert’s Roadmap to Getting Out There (When You’d Rather Stay Home) here.

3. Introvert Power: Why Your Hidden Life is Your Inner Strength

This is a book that explains exactly what it says it will—the characteristics that make you an introvert are the same characteristics from which you can draw your strength and power, according to Laurie Helgoe, PhD. Called “life-changing” in more than one review, this book is number three on my list because too many introverts view their introversion as a point of weakness, and it’s time that we all changed our mindsets.

Find Introvert Power: Why Your Hidden Life is Your Inner Strength here.

4. The Secret Lives of Introverts: Inside Our Hidden World

While similar in title to number three on our list, Jen Granneman takes her book in an entirely different direction. Remember when I said that I often don’t understand my own introversion? That’s what makes this book perfect for me, and anyone else who may feel similarly. Granneman seeks to explain what is really going on in the mind of an introvert. She discusses what is happening in our brains when we get “too into our heads,” what we need out of a partner in order to have fulfilling personal relationships, and more. This book is for anyone who is looking to better understand what it means to be an introvert.

Find The Secret Lives of Introverts: Inside Our Hidden World here.

5. Communication Toolkit for Introverts

Last, but certainly not least, on my list of must-reads is this guide by Patricia Weber. While the previous four books have been great for helping us as introverts to better understand what makes us the way we are and explaining how our introversion is a strength rather than a weakness, this book is on my list because everyone needs to take the time to improve in areas of weakness. For many introverts, that primary area of weakness is communication, and this research-based book is a great guide for learning how to improve in this area without having to change who you are as an introvert.

Find Communication Toolkit for Introverts here.

Also, check out my guide about how I deal with social overload.

I hope you enjoy reading these books written for introverts as much as I am, and let us know what you think in the comments!

Amanda is an introvert who's experienced too many awkward moments (of her own making) to count. Amanda has a cat, a coffee obsession, and more books than one person should reasonably own. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development and Learning from the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN, where she did extensive study of lifespan psychology. Amanda wrote for Military.com's SpouseBuzz blog before joining Social Pro.

Amanda Haworth

Amanda is an introvert who's experienced too many awkward moments (of her own making) to count. Amanda has a cat, a coffee obsession, and more books than one person should reasonably own. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development and Learning from the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN, where she did extensive study of lifespan psychology. Amanda wrote for Military.com's SpouseBuzz blog before joining Social Pro.

Amanda is an introvert who's experienced too many awkward moments (of her own making) to count. Amanda has a cat, a coffee obsession, and more books than one person should reasonably own. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development and Learning from the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN, where she did extensive study of lifespan psychology. Amanda wrote for Military.com's SpouseBuzz blog before joining Social Pro.

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